Senescence Reversal Diet, Lifestyle, Holistic and Happiness Medicine

Foods High in Quercetin

Dark blue or red fruitstend to have the highest quercetin content. Onions are another great source of quercetin.

Here is a list of foods high in quercetin in the form of isoquercitrin,  (source): Red raspberry, raw (3.58 mg/100 g) Black grapes (2.17 mg/ 100 g) Red onion, raw (1.80 mg/100 g)Broccoli (1.80 mg/ 100 g) Red wine (1.14 mg/ 100 ml) [note: I don’t endorse alcohol consumption] Black tea, infused (1.13 mg/ 100ml)

In the Zhu, et. alstudy, the amount of quercetin used (in combination with dasatinib) to increase the healthspan of the aging mice was 50 mg. In humans, 500-800 mg of quercetin per day for 3 months (for an initial purge of senile cells) followed by a maintenance dose of 150 mg might be effective for senolytic effects (source).

“If a supplement provides 40 mg of quercetin as isoquercitrin per day, an individual would need to consume the equivalent amount of quercetin from food, by eating approximately 8½ cups of fruits or vegetables that have a quercetin content of 2 mg per 100 grams per day.” – Lauren Martin, MS, CNS

From the data in the quote above, acquiring not even half of the senolytic dosage of quercetin might be a lofty goal. So, additional supplementationmight be necessary.

Foods High in Tocotrienols

I’m sure you’ve heard of Vitamin E. Well tocotrienols are renowned members of the this fat-soluble antioxidant family. It’s no wonder why Vitamin E gives the skin such a youthful glow!  (source)

I’m a major advocate for fruits and vegetables, but sadly, most of these foods are not good sources of tocotrienols.

Tocotrienols are naturally found in plants, such as: Palm, red – see belowRice Wheat Barley Rye Oats

The richest natural sourceof tocotrienols is the oil of the red palm fruit (source). Red palm oil can contain up to 800 mg/kg of tocotrienols and comprises approximately 80% tocotrienols.

This sounds promising, but there is current debate on whether obtaining tocotrienols through food is sufficient for senolytic effects. Because one has to consume around 80 grams of palm oil for biologically effective results, it might be better to include a palm oil-derived tocotrienol supplement. For senolytic effects, some recommend taking around 150 mg of the supplement for around 3 months and 100 mg thereafter for maintenance (source).

Foods High in Quercetin

Dark blue or red fruitstend to have the highest quercetin content. Onions are another great source of quercetin.

Side note: onions are such powerhouses when it comes to health and longevity. Refer to the post in parentheses (link) to learn more about how onions can help with anti-aging.

Here is a list of foods high in quercetin in the form of isoquercitrin,  (source):

  • Red raspberry, raw (3.58 mg/100 g)
  • Black grapes (2.17 mg/ 100 g)
  • Red onion, raw (1.80 mg/100 g)
  • Broccoli (1.80 mg/ 100 g)
  • Red wine (1.14 mg/ 100 ml) [note: I don’t endorse alcohol consumption]
  • Black tea, infused (1.13 mg/ 100ml)

In the Zhu, et. alstudy, the amount of quercetin used (in combination with dasatinib) to increase the healthspan of the aging mice was 50 mg. In humans, 500-800 mg of quercetin per day for 3 months (for an initial purge of senile cells) followed by a maintenance dose of 150 mg might be effective for senolytic effects (source).

Interesting Fact: “If a supplement provides 40 mg of quercetin as isoquercitrin per day, an individual would need to consume the equivalent amount of quercetin from food, by eating approximately 8½ cups of fruits or vegetables that have a quercetin content of 2 mg per 100 grams per day.” – Lauren Martin, MS, CNS

From the data in the quote above, acquiring not even half of the senolytic dosage of quercetin might be a lofty goal. So, additional supplementationmight be necessary.

Foods High in Tocotrienols

I’m sure you’ve heard of Vitamin E. Well tocotrienols are renowned members of the this fat-soluble antioxidant family. It’s no wonder why Vitamin E gives the skin such a youthful glow!  (source)

I’m a major advocate for fruits and vegetables, but sadly, most of these foods are not good sources of tocotrienols.

Tocotrienols are naturally found in plants, such as:

  • Palm, red – see below
  • Rice
  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Oats

The richest natural sourceof tocotrienols is the oil of the red palm fruit (source). For people, like myself, who don’t endorse heavy consumption of grains, this is awesome news! Red palm oil can contain up to 800 mg/kg of tocotrienols and comprises approximately 80% tocotrienols.

This sounds promising, but there is current debate on whether obtaining tocotrienols through food is sufficient for senolytic effects. Because one has to consume around 80 grams of palm oil (which simply is a lot of oil) for biologically effective results, it might be better to include a palm oil-derived tocotrienol supplement. For senolytic effects, some recommend taking around 150 mg of the supplement for around 3 months and 100 mg thereafter for maintenance (source).

Conclusion

As I’ve explained above, research has shown quercetin and tocotrienols to be effective against senescent cells and aging. This indicates that consumption of these compounds could benefit longevity and health span.

While it is clear that supplementation might be necessary to achieve senolytic dosages for quercetin and tocotrienols, I firmly believe that obtaining these compounds naturally through food is equally important for not only senolytic effects, but also overall health and vitality.

 

 

 

Strategies for Adding Years to Your Life and Life to Your Years

Unfortunately, medical care for the elderly has turned into a game of whack-a-mole. The standard medical system deals with each disease in isolation, rather than treating the whole person and correcting the underlying biological processes that have caused an immune system to run amuck. The result is that individuals get “cured” of one disease, such as cancer, only to develop another one two or three years down the road.

Rather than tackling individual diseases, our focus should be on extending our healthspan,not just our lifespan. Who wants to live longer if those years are filled with misery? Inorder to achieve this, we must address the root cause of illness and aging, and intervene before the damage accumulates. We can do this by addressing the following factors:

1. DIET AND NUTRITION 2. TOXIC EXPOSURES
3. PHYSICALACTIVITY 4. BRAIN FITNESS

5. HIGH-QUALITY SLEEP
6. STRESS
7. LIVINGWITHPURPOSEANDGRATITUDE

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1. A DIET FOR LONGEVITY

As the Ikarians so aptly demonstrate, when it comes to diet we need
to get back to the basics. Whole foods with abundant fresh produce and minimal processed food are necessary for optimal longevity. Other than eating cleanly, there are a few other dietary strategies that science suggests may lead to a longer and healthier life.

While excessive food consumption leads to metabolic syndrome and shortens overalllifespan, calorie restriction has been shown to flip on longevity genes and prevent or delayage-related diseases. The problem is, fasting long-term is not practical for most humans and nearly impossible to sustain for years on end.

What is sustainable? Intermittent fasting, or periodic calorie restriction. A fasting-mimicking diet offers many of the same benefits as fasting but without the downsides.Various versions go by various names… intermittent fasting, feast-or-famine diet, periodic calorie restriction, etc. In all versions, calories are restricted for periods of time, followed by periods of eating normally. When calories are intermittently restricted, the body maintainsa “lasting memory” of optimal metabolic function. There are even greater benefits ifproteins and sugars are restricted.

Fasting-mimicking diets have positive long-term benefits for IGF-1 levels. As you willrecall, lower IGF-1 is associated with greater longevity. Intermittent calorie restriction also boosts cellular regeneration and rejuvenation, as well as stem cell production. Cells are cleaned out during the fasting phase, and then rebuilt during the “refeeding” phase.Fasting has proven benefits for blood sugar regulation, hormone function, fat burning,cardiovascular function, overall immune function, and longevity.

Protein seems to have a Goldilocks zone. It is important to consume “just enough” protein to avoid losing lean muscle mass as you age but not enough to activate the mTOR pathway, which accelerates aging.14, 15

Valter Longo, Ph.D., UCLA professor and director of The Longevity Institute, has doneextensive research on diet and aging and provides specific guidelines for a fasting-mimicking diet in his 2018 book, The Longevity Diet, which might be a helpful resource.

  1. 14  Johnson SC, Rabinovitch PS, Kaeberlein M. mTOR is a key modulator of ageing and age-related disease. Nature. 2013;493(7432):338-345.doi:10.1038/nature11861.
  2. 15  O’Leary, Mary Beth. “Controlling Protein Intake May Be Key to Longevity, Studies Show.” 1st Edition. March 4, 2014. Accessed May 30, 2018.

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https://www.elsevier.com/connect/controlling-protein-intake-may-be-key-to-longevity.

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Many foods and supplements have been shown to benefit longevity. To go into them all
is beyond the scope of this report, but you will find a summary in the table below withlinks to more information. Many of these foods are in the top ten on GreenMedInfo’s Aging research database.

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Astaxanthin

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A compound in astaxanthin, CDX-08, increases the “longevity gene” (FOXO3) in mice, which increases longevity;16 proven benefits for lipid profile, oxidative stress, blood sugar, cognition, athletic performance, and more

Blueberry

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Rich in anti-aging polyphenols; study shows blueberries slow brain aging by 2.5 years; reduces cognitive decline; improves insulin sensitivity; protects heart, lungs, and blood vessels; anticancer

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Berberine

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Activates AMPK; inhibits mTOR; extremely beneficial for lipid profile; improves insulin sensitivity; ameliorates NAFLD and IBS

Coffee

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According to NEJM, older adults who drink coffee have a lower risk of death overall than non-coffee drinkers (no difference between caffeinated and decaf); mechanism unclear, but coffee contains more than 1,000 health-benefitting compounds

Flaxseed

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Just one ounce daily can neutralize age-associated inflammation bymodulating oxylipins, a type of fat molecule that plays a critical role in chronic disease progression; reduces blood pressure and arterial damage

Gingko Biloba

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Stimulates BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) which extends life of brain cells and long-term memory; modulates neural stem cells; increases brain circulation; as effective as donepezil in treating Alzheimer’s; ginkgo plants themselves can live more than 1,000 years!

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Ginseng (Red)

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Red ginseng (panax ginseng) improves blood vessel wall health,boosts vessel dilation and flexibility; better blood sugar and insulin control; extends lives of HIV positive individuals

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Green Tea

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Contains EGCG, shown to produce aging-slowing, lifespan-extending effects; mitochondrial biogenesis

16 UHCancerCenter. “Astaxanthin Compound Found to Switch on the FOX03 ‘longevity Gene’ in Mice.” EurekAlert! March 28, 2017. Accessed May 30, 2018. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-03/uohc-acf032717.php.

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Magnesium

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Supports cardiovascular health and longevity; prolongs cell health and ability to divide; prevention of age-related diseases; adrenal support, adaptation to stress, and “buffering effect” for fight-flight hormones; sleep, helps reverse nighttime neuroendocrine age-related changes

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Mushrooms

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Loaded with antioxidants and age-extending nutrients such as ergo- thioneine, vitamin D, and glutathione; in one study, the acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide fraction 3 (RF3) in reishi mushrooms was found to increase lifespan and expression of longevity-related transcrip- tion factor DAF-16 in C. elegans, leading to an increase in 15 different lifespan-extending proteins

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Resveratrol

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Increases mitochondrial biogenesis; anti-inflammatory; anticarcino- genic; antioxidant; regulates insulin; increases blood flow; animalstudies indicate it may extend lifespan; study shows resveratrol with calorie restriction promotes longevity; may reduce clumps of proteins linked to Alzheimer’s disease

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Turmeric (curcumin)

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The “one-stop shop” herb for longevity! Curcumin prevents telomere shortening and may promote elongation by increasing telomerase expression; preserves brain health by preventing age-related brain damage; reduces oxidative stress; promotes mitochondrial homeostasis; increases AMPK activity (see exercise section below)

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Vitamin E

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Linked to longer telomeres in women; reduces DNA damage; upregu- lates telomerase; slows skin aging; maintains muscle

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Zinc

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Reduces oxidative damage; binds with certain proteins linked to in- flammation and age-related immunodeficiency

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2. MINIMIZING TOXIC EXPOSURES

When it comes to damaging DNA and compromising mitochondria, environmental toxins really leave their mark. Cumulative toxicity affects longevity—take air quality, for example.

Americans living in places with cleaner air are known to live longer.
Many public health studies show that those who live near chemical
factories and other polluting industries show greater risk for premature death. The CDC’s statistics reveal that residents of eight states (most in the South) show reduced longevity from dirtier air related to looser air pollution regulations.17 There is even an online
tool called “Air Quality Life Index,” developed by the University of Chicago.18 It allows
you estimate how much longer you would live if your country of residence reduced air pollution to comply with either national or WHO standards.

The best thing you can do to lengthen your lifespan and healthspan is eat cleanly, avoidtoxic products, and filter your water and air. Supporting your body’s natural detoxificationefforts is also a necessity in today’s toxic world.

3. TO LIVE LONGER, GET PHYSICAL

Research published in the American Journal of Physiology indicatesexercise may minimize and even reverse age-associated declines in mitochondrial function. This has wide-ranging implications, as the health of your mitochondria intimately affects every single cell, tissue, and organ in your body.

Mitochondrial density and function decline as we age. While this is a natural process, it can be accelerated by excessive stress, environmental radiation, chemical exposures (includingpharmaceutical drugs), nutritional deficiencies, and inherited mitochondrial DNA defects. Exercise has the benefit of rejuvenating mitochondria and prompting your body to makemore of them, whereas lack of exercise hastens mitochondrial degeneration.

In older adults, high-intensity exercise is associated with preservation of telomere length, which might relate to changes in telomerase activity.19 Telomerase physiology is

  1. 17  Gilderbloom, John I. , and Gregory D. Squires. “How Environmental Toxins Reduce Life Expectancy in Many American Neighborhoods.” Scholars Strategy Network. April 13, 2016. Accessed May 30, 2018. https://scholars.org/brief/how-environmental-toxins-reduce-life-expectancy-many- american-neighborhoods.
  2. 18  “The Air Quality Life IndexTM.” EPIC Pollution Index. Accessed May 30, 2018. https://aqli.epic.uchicago.edu/.
  3. 19  LaRocca TJ, Seals DR, Pierce GL. Leukocyte Telomere Length is Preserved with Aging in Endurance Exercise-Trained Adults and Related to

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Maximal Aerobic Capacity. Mechanisms of ageing and development. 2010;131(2):165-167. doi:10.1016/j.mad.2009.12.009.

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complicated, and some warn that lengthening telomeres by overexpressing telomerase may actually increase one’s cancer risk. Perhaps moderation is the key.

Another reason exercise is such a beneficial anti-aging strategy is that it stimulatesAMPK activity. What is AMPK? AMPK, which stands for adenosine monophosphate- activated protein kinase, is a cellular enzyme found in every cell of the body. It’s kind of a master metabolic switch, controlling a gamut of energy pathways. AMPK performs the following roles:20

  •   MONITORING CELLULAR ENERGY, AND THEN TRIGGERING RESPONSES THAT MAINTAIN OPTIMAL LEVELS
  •   REGULATING METABOLIC HOMEOSTASIS AND CELL SURVIVAL DURING TIMES OF STRESS
  •   STIMULATING PRODUCTION OF MITOCHONDRIA
  •   COORDINATING SIGNALING OF MANY AGE-RELATED TRANSCRIPTIONFACTOR PATHWAYSResearch suggests increased AMPK activity can extend lifespan, but responsiveness
    of AMPK activation declines with age. Regardless of which disease or organ system is involved, if you trace a pathological process back far enough, you will likely track down anAMPK activity insufficiency problem.Besides exercise, AMPK activity can be boosted a number of ways—fasting or calorie restriction, high-quality sleep, cold water immersion, acupuncture, and by eating various foods. The best AMPK-activating foods include turmeric, legumes, green tea, red wine, blueberries, and extra virgin olive oil. A Vietnamese herb called Gynostemma pentaphyllumis also a powerful AMPK activator.

    How much should you exercise?

    Any amount of exercise is better than none, according to the latest Harvard studies. LINK Individuals who do not exercise at all have the highest risk of early death. Those who exercise just a little can lower their risk by 20 percent, and those who meet current governmental health guidelines (150 minutes of moderate exercise per week) enjoy a 31 percent lower risk of premature death.

20 Salminen, Antero, and Kai Kaarniranta. “AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Controls the Aging Process via an Integrated Signaling Net- work.” Ageing Research Reviews11, no. 2 (April 2012): 230-41. Accessed May 30, 2018. doi:10.1016/j.arr.2011.12.005.

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The sweet spot, however, seems to be in tripling the current exercise recommendations. Walking 450 minutes per week, or a little over an hour per day, lowers the risk ofpremature death by 39 percent. Beyond that, the benefits plateau.

4. BRAIN FITNESS

Sustained engagement in learning new skills that activate working
memory, episodic memory, and reasoning are important in maintaining
cognitive function as we age. Studies show that ongoing engagement
in cognitively demanding, novel activities is what enhances memory
function into older adulthood.21 It isn’t as simple as doing crossword
puzzles and sudoku—the brain must be challenged with new tasks you’re
not used to performing. Try adding a new hobby such as quilting or digital photography. Play a different game. Volunteer at something you haven’t done before.

5. RESTORATIVE SLEEP

Sleep clears out brain toxins, and this alone helps optimize both lifespan
and healthspan. One reason sleep is so critical is it facilitates the
function of the glymphatic system, your brain’s trash removal system.
During sleep, the brain works 10 times as hard to remove toxic proteins
like the ones responsible for Alzheimer’s damage.22 A University of
Oregon study shows middle-aged or older people who get six to nine
hours of sleep per night have better cognition than those sleeping either fewer or more hours.23

6. MANAGING STRESS

As already discussed, stress management is critical for living a long,healthy life. Many physical activities have the added benefit of beinggood stress busters. Some examples include yoga, Tai Chi, dance, and hiking out in nature.

While yoga’s longevity-promoting effects have been the subject of
legend for millennia, modern science is confirming this ancient technology for spiritual

  1. 22  Xie, L., H. Kang, Q. Xu, M. J. Chen, Y. Liao, M. Thiyagarajan, J. Odonnell, D. J. Christensen, C. Nicholson, J. J. Iliff, T. Takano, R. Deane, and M. Nedergaard. “Sleep Drives Metabolite Clearance from the Adult Brain.” Science342, no. 6156 (October 18, 2013): 373-77. Accessed May 30,2018. doi:10.1126/science.1241224.
  2. 23  Gildner, Theresa E., Melissa A. Liebert, Paul Kowal, Somnath Chatterji, and J. Josh Snodgrass. “Associations between Sleep Duration, Sleep Quality, and Cognitive Test Performance among Older Adults from Six Middle Income Countries: Results from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE).” Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 2014. Accessed May 30, 2018. doi:10.5664/jcsm.3782.

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and physical well-being can slow actually slow aging and stimulate our regenerative potential. Yoga has been shown to improve age-related respiratory problems, cognitivedecline, hormone insufficiency, sleep issues, and aging-related depression.

According to Dr. John Denninger of the Benson-Henry Institute, certain genes turn on and off during yoga, triggering beneficial responses in the body and the brain. In a powerful2014 study in the journal Age, researchers concluded:

“Yogic practices might help in the prevention of age-related degeneration by changing cardiometabolic risk factors, autonomic function, and BDNF.”

People who do yoga and meditation enjoy a significantly reduced rate of cellular aging,according to one 2017 study. Meditation itself is associated with longer telomeres and increased cellular longevity.

Another evidence-supported practice is Tai Chi, which is akin to a moving meditation. TaiChi boasts a mountain of science backing its health benefits for people of all ages andabilities—from healthy young adults to the elderly or wheelchair-bound.

As an overall tool for stress management, a technique called EFT (emotional freedom techniques, aka “tapping”) is hard to beat. Tapping can be learned at home and is effective with a wide variety of conditions, from PTSD and major depression to general anxiety and everyday stress. Even children can learn tapping!

If you want to live a longer and happier, consider adopting a pet. Science shows petowners are reaping an impressive number of health benefits, including reduced risk forheart attack and stroke, lower levels of pain, better immune function—and yes, improved longevity! A large recent Swedish study found that dog owners have a lower risk of death from all causes, especially those who live without the company of other humans.24

That said, if stress and anxiety are your primary concern, you might opt for a cat because cats appear to be better stress-reducers.25

  1. 24  Mubanga, Mwenya, Liisa Byberg, Christoph Nowak, Agneta Egenvall, Patrik K. Magnusson, Erik Ingelsson, and Tove Fall. “Dog Ownership and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Death – a Nationwide Cohort Study.” Scientific Reports7, no. 1 (November 17, 2017).doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16118-6.
  2. 25  PhD, Catharine Paddock. “Cat Owners Have Lower Heart Attack Risk, Study.” Medical News Today. February 25, 2008. Accessed May 30, 2018.https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/98432.php.

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7. PURPOSEFUL LIVING

When it comes to psychosocial factors that can extend your life, havinga purpose rises to the top of the list. One way to define purpose is, “acentral, self-organizing life aim that organizes and stimulates goals, manages behaviors, and provides a sense of meaning.”26

Purpose is what links everything together. A sense of purpose is much like
the Japanese concept of ikigai, or “life worth living,” which they believe is associated with longer life. We should take note—the Japanese are doing something right! Feeling that yourlife is worth living brings mental and physical benefits in a kind of positive feedback loop.

Not only is purpose one of the most commonly cited values by Centenarians, but recent reports show that a sense of purpose is an actual mortality predictor across adulthood.27People with a greater sense of purpose are motivated to engage in healthier lifestyle behaviors, such as eating their veggies or getting more exercise. Purpose is also linked to sleep quality.

In the Blue Zones, people value healthy rituals, community, and meaningful purpose. They don’t identify with disease or compare themselves with neighbors or friends. They are quick to forgive others and even quicker to forgive themselves.

Speaking of community, loneliness or social isolation is another influence on lifeexpectancy. In a large meta-analysis, people who reported being lonely were 26 percent more likely to have died during the seven-year research study. Mortality risk was 20 percent higher among those who were socially isolated versus those who were not, and 32 percent higher for people who lived alone versus those who did not.28

An interesting study was performed using African grey parrots. The parrots with parrot companions had longer telomeres than parrots without partners.29

Does gratitude affect life expectancy? Possibly! The more gratitude one feels, the lower the risk of heart attack. And the more grateful people feel, the better they tend to takecare of themselves. Gratitude and positive emotions benefit physical health and stressmanagement, so it’s likely a life-extender as well.

  1. 26  Mcknight, Patrick E., and Todd B. Kashdan.“Purpose in Life as a System That Creates and Sustains Health and Well-being: An Integrative, Testable Theory.” Review of General Psychology13, no. 3 (2009): 242-51. doi:10.1037/a0017152.
  2. 27  Hill, Patrick L., and Nicholas A. Turiano. “Purpose in Life as a Predictor of Mortality Across Adulthood.” Psychological Science25, no. 7 (2014): 1482-486. Accessed May 30, 2018. doi:10.1177/0956797614531799.
  3. 28  Holt-Lunstad, Julianne, Timothy B. Smith, Mark Baker, Tyler Harris, and David Stephenson. “Loneliness and Social Isolation as Risk Factors for Mortality.” Perspectives on Psychological Science10, no. 2 (March 11, 2015): 227-37. Accessed May 30, 2018. doi:10.1177/1745691614568352.
  4. 29  “Press Release 04-04-2014 – Loneliness Impacts DNA Repair.” Vetmeduni Vienna. April 03, 2014. Accessed May 30, 2018. http://www. vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/presseinformation/press-releases-2014/press-release-04-04-2014-loneliness-impacts-dna-repair/.

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The Long and Short of It

How long you live is a complex interaction between genetics and environment, nature
and nurture, lifestyle and personality. Longevity extends far beyond your genetic predispositions and foods, although those things are certainly important. None of us knows our expiration date—and that’s probably a good thing. Regardless of your age, there are many evidence-based strategies that can help you stack the odds in your favor. This report just skims the surface but provides a good launching point for identifying what your “longevity weak spots” might be.

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GREENMEDINFO AGING RESEARCH PDF

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Aging

Sourced from the US National Library of Medicine

http://pubmed.gov

Research Topic

Aging

Research Subtopics

Aging Skin
Aging: Brain
Aging: Immunosenecence Aging: Prostate
Skin Diseases: Photo-Aging Wrinkles, Aging Skin

This Smart Search PDF was created based on 1 research topic. There are a total of 438unique research articles on GreenMedInfo.com in regard to your search topic, all compiled in this research document.

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The GMI-Pub system automates the natural medical research retrieval process by creating an individualized document that matches your search requirements in order to fit the needs of real people, in real time.

Our technology pulls from the equivalent of 20,454+ years of scientific experimental labor and pulls results based on variables the user decides are relevant.

Overview of Terms Associated with Your Search Topic

221 Relevant Results for Substances

Substance Name

Resveratrol Flavonoids Polyphenols Vitamin E Green Tea Soy

Vitamin C Melatonin Catechin Alpha-Lipoic Acid Curcumin

Cumulative Article Knowledge Count

65 32 60 16 18 11 58 10 53 15 49 10 37 8 36 14 29 12 27 6 25 14

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Tea 96

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Blueberry
Zinc
Ginkgo biloba Multivitamin Genistein Echinacea Pomegranate Grape Seed Extract

53 11 49 10 45 13 30 3 17 5 16 5 16 6 15 4

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Below you will find compelling research hard-referenced to peer-reviewed biomedical research sourced from the US National Library of Medicine. For more research on over 6000 validated topics, please visithttp://GreenMedInfo.com/research-dashboard

Selenium
Isoflavones
NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) Sulforaphane
Vitamin D
Creatine
Artichoke
Pycnogenol (Pine Bark) Vegetables: All
Coenzyme Q10
Bacopa
Anthocyanins
Probiotics
Chocolate
Kaempferia parviflora Persimmon
Pine Bark Extract
Strawberry
White Tea
Antioxidant formulas
Berries: All
Black Tea
Fermented Foods and Beverages Tomato
Aloe Vera
Horse Chestnut Acetyl-l-carnitine
Apples

14 4 12 2 9 5 8 5 7 3 4 2 3 2 22 3 21 3 16 4 15 4 14 3 14 4 12 2 12 2 12 2 12 2 12 2 12 3 11 2 11 2 11 2 11 2 11 2 10 1 10 1 7 4 7 4

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Astaxanthin Astragalus Lotus Oleuropein Arginine Cocoa

6 4 6 5 6 3 6 4 5 3 5 3

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Rose 53

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Amla Fruit
Broccoli
Chinese Skullcap
OPC (Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins) Rosemary

Royal Jelly
Sprouts
Thioproline
Blackberry
Cannabinoids
EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate) Epimedium

Folic Acid
Myricetin
Boswellia
Cistanche deserticola
DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid) Huperzine

Icariin
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) Pterostilb

Conventional

 

 

 

 

Mech Ageing Dev. 2018 Nov 3;176:19-23. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2018.10.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Caloric restriction and cellular senescence.

Fontana L1, Nehme J2, Demaria M3.

Author information

Abstract

Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest characterized by hypertrophy and secretion of various bioactive molecules, a phenomenon defined the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP). Senescent cells are implicated in a number of biological functions, from embryogenesis to aging. Significantly, excessive accumulation of senescent cells is associated to a decline of regenerative capacity and chronic inflammation. In accordance, the removal of senescent cells is sufficient to delay several pathologies and promote healthspan. Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition is currently the most effective non-genetic intervention to delay aging phenotypes. Recently, we have shown that CR can prevent accumulation of senescent cells in both mice and humans.

Mech Ageing Dev. 2018 Nov 3;176:19-23. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2018.10.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Caloric restriction and cellular senescence.

Fontana L1, Nehme J2, Demaria M3.

Author information

 

 

 

 

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